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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states than anywhere else. the second of, third of the pillars involves economic freedom. private property rights with legal titles and deeds, anti-free market economy. now, these may seem synonymous, but they are not. as hernando desoto pointed out, in many places of the world, there is and the symbols of a free economy at work. but there's no system of title deed to land or other property. this has
a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german defense minister at the time was forced to step down for his handling of the affair. >> coming up later in
processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great expression in the 1930 -- you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to
indeployment of the patriot missile batteries from u.s., germany and netherlands. this would serve to be a pretty firm warning to the flailing assad regime to mess with nato member, turkey. if you talk to some of most vocal critics, though of the proposal, and that would be the russians who are in brussels at that nato meet and who were here, putin in istanbul, meeting with turkish leadership yesterday, they argue further militarizing this long border will only serve to escalate tensions. >> all right. ivan, thanks so much. ivan watson in istanbul, who is being down near that bordertown that has been the subject of shelling. moving on. before the scandal broke, many people could have seen former cia director david patreaus running for office. and now there is news that he was indeed approached. the way he was approached may surprise you. >>> also -- israel standing firm on its decision to go forward with construction of new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. hear what that might mean for the middle east peace process if that even exists. and when you switch from anoth
by or be confined by the weak europe including germany appears to be on the brink of recession. the last quarter was fabulous, best in its history. stocks a half a point off its high. terrific 51% gain since i got behind it on august of 2011. it's not done. i think it has room to run. let's check in with the co-ceo of sap. >> good to see you, jim. >> best third quarter in history. >> yes. >> how is it possible? >> we're focused on the nexus of forces as you mentioned. when we put the strategy of the company together we were determined to double the addressable market. where's the world going? it's going mobile. do you know anyone that doesn't have a mobile device? >> no. and i don't want anything else frankly. >> exactly. more mobile devices in the world than toothbrushes. that was good enough for us to focus on mobile. >> are you still the largest buyer of some mobile devices? >> i don't know in we're the largest but up there. we have done a lot of work with apple no doubt about it. we focused on mobile and big data. data is doubling in the world every 18 months. so it's probably a good idea to
the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the americans with disabilities act. >> the treaty was supported by organizations representing people with disabilities and veterans groups but that was not good enough for 38 republicans. it was supported by senator john mccain, himself a disabled veteran. >> bob dole has been our leader on the issue of disabilities from the moment he stepped foot into the chamber. to
to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the seasonal increases go away, we could have tax increases rand spending cuts if we get a deal. why is that going on a headwind for the stock market? >> i think it will be. if the taxes go up, i think that's something that hurts consumer confidence. you've seen the retail sales in the last part of this season here, have sold off, and many people have said it's because of the fiscal cliff. >> kind of depressing when you say it's a nothing market between now and the end of 2013. how do you make money, if you want to see it's going to be a -- >> he knows rhyme going to say buy apple. it's up 20%, up 50% and some off a little bit. if it sells off, you'll have nice dividend stocks like ant anti--sizer, the subplatform of all of the sma
.s. on that list? look who is next to us. >> behind the u.s. is germany and uae. united arab of emirates. >> when you go to dubai, did you see the islands? they are empty. nobody is there. >> that's what makes it a happy place. >> usa number one. we solved that problem. from rankings to spankings. after they gripped some have griped. mesa, arizona high school is getting a lot of crap for forcing two students to hold hands for punishment of fighting. the parents were giving the choice of suspension or holding hands in front of classmates. kids were laughing at them calling them name asking, are you gay? a photo of the boys sitting in the chair paw in paw ended up on facebook, a famous book of faces. one commenter said it encourages bull -- bullying and another says it sends a bad message to gay students. we asked a student to comment. >> that's not right. >> that student has been in a lot of our stories. they are always ready to talk to our cameras. bernie, did this punishment go too far or not far enough? >> let me just say that once again i am stunned. we were told that when they were passing th
actually ended up looking pretty darn good. germany up 30%. i mean, i look at that, and i say all of the fear that was out there including the euro stocks, 600 did unbelievably beautifully. and you say, my goodness, if you went toward the worst, most fearsome place, europe, you would have done way better than here in the u.s.. >> yeah, absolutely. well, it's like everything that happens in nature as well as the markets and the equity markets. when things get stretched too far one way, they will come back to a happy medium. we saw that in the equity markets this year. they were the best performing asset classes of all the places you could put your money, and it's not without knowing what's going on when you had unprecedented types of money flows coming from central banks around the globe, that money had to go somewhere. the u.s. market has performed very well. by the time we get done today, especially on the fiscal cliff talks, we're going to be up about 14% in the s&p 500. the leaders in that were, of course, financials, tech and consumer discretionary. they performed very, very w
-800-345-2550 this morning, i'm going to trade in hong kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 be
the markets in switzerland, netherlands, germany do better than us? how is that possible? because of you, washington. it's because of you. we've been kept back all because of you. second, before our politicians stepped in with the intransigence and anger, we were about to have an explosion in earnings. retail was stronger than it was in a decade, autos back incredibly robust. and that's just the beginning. because all the pent up demand. we're running short of office buildings, shopping centers, apartments, homes, these are the hiring sectors, all this blather about helping the small businessman of subchapter "s" for private and middle class, you want to help them? give them a deal, any deal, just get out of our way for heaven sakes. our country is starting to get so competitive, again, that business is building things over there now want to build them there. tim cook tells brian williams that his company's going to make macs in this country. we're better than kmochina. meanwhile our costs are plummeting courtesy of the cleaner, cheaper fuel, natural gas. so cheap here it can be lique li
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
campaign to run germany for a third time. the election is in the third quarter of next year. she actually warned against premature optimism over the crisis saying the worst is not over and we must be cautious going forward. now to a certain extent she would say that, would she not? otherwise we're not out of the woods. keep me in charge. but that was the message that came out of germany today. elsewhere as we kind of wait for things to happen, it's interesting the bond markets continue to rally. we were talking about this yesterday that greece has priced the debt buyback where it has. it will be more generous and next week they're likely to get their money from the rest of the european union. taking some of those concerns back out of the market so, again, today the spanish bond market rallying and, therefore, the yield forming. still above 5% but falling. it's also true of italy. there the yields are down. take a look at where we are on the ten year, 4.4% and those bonds rise in value, you see the italian banks, for example, rising in value. the stock market, it's obvious the value of the
one. >> angela merkel number two. easy to understand. >> europe goes through germany and germany goes through merkel. >> let's talk about vladimir putin coming in at number three. >> yes. he has been on the list even when he wasn't president because we all know who was still running the show then. he's back up there with a bullet. he's been as high as two on this list. here is somebody who has a u.n. security council permanency, controls a huge oil and gas reserve, has a nuclear tipped army and wields his power very effectively. >> and loves to show his muscles. many times as possible. >> powerful in many ways. that's right. >> of late bill gates has been the rodney dangerfield of silicon valley or seattle. he gets absolutely no respect but you give him plenty. he comes in at number four. why? >> this is where you talk about the spheres of power. here's somebody who is trying to cure world disease. in favourable terms of affecting millions of lives. he is 57 years old. he's the second richest man in the world. he has the most influential nonprofit in the world. and if you just look at
. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today. under performance on madrid. just got to mention where we are on the greek banks. they are now going through a position where the central bank is saying we think they need 27, 28 billion euros. the questio
with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works,
countries -- germany says it's going to send in soldiers to neighboring turkey. why do you suppose there is such anxiety and such fear around that country and the possibility that that could happen? >> well, within the context of what turkey asked nato for, the patriot missile defense system, you have nato member countries who are now essentially saying through their partly i wants, yes, we are going to help you militarily defend yourself. the big question, however, is are other countries bringing up the possible threat of chemical weapons coming from syria as a way of laying the ground work for another kind of not intervention, but a assistance to rebel groups. you have a lot of strategic talk that's being publicly sort of expressed out there that could be laying the ground work for strategic help for rebel groups. also for russia and iran and china and other countries that support the assad regime to perhaps distance themselves a little bit from the syrian president. we have all those reasons that are coming -- that are like the pieces of the puzzle. you make it out. is the threa
that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409 tdd#:
this morning actually. i know it's boring but the greek deal looks a little more likely. germany making positive comments so stock futures are up. big story in "the wall street journal" about how the rest of the world is slow to get on the natural gas bandwagon which could be good for the united states and canada because they need gas around the world which means we may be the more likely go-to source and delta airlines reportedly in the hunt for half a stake in virgin atlantic. they covet some new landing spots at heathrow airport. barnicle can fly back and forth on london to get a new castle or a guinness or whatever his choice is. and i'm going to leave you with this. it is the 20th birthday of the text message. on this date 20 years ago, it was created. and now university students send an average of 3,200 text messages per month rof, lol, omg. >> brian, quickly, back to the virgin atlantic/delta story, if that goes through, any estimate on the amount of bags that the combined airlines could lose coming together? >> reporter: you know, i tell you what, singapore air now owns 49% of v
is the united states and germany both number 16? >> well, i think it's to do partly with the economic prospects which are not so great. also to do with things like crime rate in the united states, people like to feel safe and they feel safer in some of these european countries and australia does work very well, too. >> what's great britain's problem? why are they -- >> many problems in britain. not the least we have not such great economic prospects prepared for a lot of these countries. and we have high rates of social problems as well. >> a lot of it is to do with social cohesion. when you look at the countries in the top, switzerland, australia, denmark, singapore, they all have a strong sense of national and social cohesion and i would say one of the questions that really affects quality of life in a country today is do people feel they're pulling together and feel part of society or not? >> is there a consistency about the top countries, what they're doing in terms of economic plans and what they're investing? >> that's not what the survey looked at particularly but it is also sobering 20
[ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> producer john tower, we have our replacements for fiscal cliff. please only read the clean ones. >> jason writes, money boo boo. calvin, pricey precipice. i like this one. allen, monetary manhole. >> monetary manhole. we're getting stripper names and other categories we don't want to get into. great show, everyone. "morning joe" starts right now. > ♪ and i'm free ♪ free falling >>> you know, it's a special time of the year. we've been looking forward to it for months now. and everywhere you go, you can see the twinkle in little children's eyes because they know that in just a few short weeks, ♪ the fiscal cliff is coming to town ♪ merry cliffmas. and with a dramatic name like fiscal cliff, it's got to be exciting. jim? >> the president's asking for $1.6 trillion in revenue. >> $600 billion in tax
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)